Did you Know…? – help with referencing

Once you have researched and started writing your dissertation or project you must remember to correctly acknowledge the sources of any information which you refer to. This allows readers to trace the original material while also ensuring that you avoid potentially committing plagiarism. 

To help you with your referencing, Library staff have prepared several online guides with useful examples. We have a generic guide on Referencing and Citing as well as others focused on specific referencing systems or subject areas: 

Please be sure, though, to also refer to any specific referencing guidance which you may have been provided by your department. You can also see advice on avoiding plagiarism on the Student Learning Service’s website and PGT students can also check in MyAberdeen for materials on academic writing and avoiding plagiarism.

We also have access to a really useful book by Colin Neville called Complete guide to referencing and avoiding plagiarism which goes over topics from why you need to reference, where, the different referencing styles, plagiarism and how to express your own ideas in an assignment.

If you need any help with referencing your dissertation or project please feel free to contact Library staff with any questions you may have.

EBSCO Quick Guide

The EBSCO platform contains databases across many subject areas. Each database contains information on research published in selected journals and conferences. Some of the databases contain information related to books. Here are the databases currently available from EBSCO:  

Anthropology Plus, Art & Architecture Complete, ATLA Religion Database, British Education Index, Child Development & Adolescent Studies, CINAHL, Education Abstracts, Educational Administration Abstracts,  ERIC, European Views of the Americas: 1493 to 1750, GreenFILE, LISTA, MLA International Bibliography with Full Text, RILM Abstracts of Music Literature, SPORTDiscus, Teacher Reference Center.  

Sign in to Primo and search for a title. If the book is available from EBSCO, the following steps will apply:

 Click on the title of the book to be taken to the book details page and navigate to the full text using your University username and password.

Once you are in EBSCO, the book will be displayed like so:

You have the options of Reading the book online (PDF Full Text) or Download the item. If you choose reading online, it will display like this:  

If you choose to download, the following messages will be displayed on your screen. Please note that different books may have different downloading options, depending on the Digital Rights Management (DRM) agreements. For a non-DRM book, the steps to download are as follows:  

The image is showing the prompt that will appear to 'Download Ebook.' There are options to do this as a PDF, or as an 'E-PUB' for mobile devices.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is down-arrow-2.png

For a book requiring a DRM licence, please note that you will need to set up an EBSCO Personal Account. Advice on how to do so can be found at https://bit.ly/3xl84j0.

To download, select your preferred ‘Download Format’ like so:  

Once the item is downloaded, the site recommends you open it with Adobe Reader. More information can be found at:  

https://bit.ly/3vx8phj 
https://adobe.ly/3vDtDKc

User Features in EBSCO  

Once you have found the book(s) you need in EBSCO, there are a range of options as to how you can use them. This Tools section can be found on the right hand side of the item’s display page as shown:  

If you are reading online, similar icons are displayed across the top of the screen:  

Adding/Saving Items to Folder: EBSCO offers this feature to act as a virtual bookshelf, where you also have options to save, print or email the details, and export them to RefWorks or similar programmes.  

Saving/Emailing References: EBSCO allows both singular and multiple references to be taken from searched material. Detailed instructions and advice on how to do so can be found in the Help section under ‘Emailing’: https://bit.ly/3cPJUFB

Exporting Bibliographic Details to Ref Works-Option to Export on right hand side of screen. Opens links to Ref Works and other providers, and can directly export. For further help, please see our detailed Library Guides.   

Accessibility-The Help section includes an Accessibility Guide covering navigation of the site, the readers (PDF and EPUB), read aloud software and EBSCO’s commitments. It can be found here: https://bit.ly/3vD86RV   

Help and Support-Extensive Help section on website (top right-hand side of screen). Includes user guides, accessibility pages and tutorials.  

Licences-There are three categories here: ‘Unlimited User Access’; ‘Limited Access (3 Users)’, and ‘Limited Access (1 User)’. If the book is unavailable, the site will give various messages along the lines of ‘Item unable to download. Please Read Online’ or ‘Item unavailable for download, please try again later.’  

If you wish to search a specific database on the EBSCO platform, please follow these steps:  

  1. Go to Primo and sign in at the top right of the screen 
  1.  Select the Find Databases tab 
  1. In the new window that appears enter EBSCO in the box called Database Search and click on search 
  1. A list will be created containing the different databases which we currently have access to through the EBSCO platform  
  1. Click on any one of the databases to link out to the EBSCO platform. Primo will open the database’s details page. In the View Online section click on the name of the database e.g. ERIC (EBSCO). Once on EBSCO you can change the particular database you are actually searching in. If off-campus, you may be asked to sign in via your institution. Select University of Aberdeen and sign in with your username and password. 

For more information see our EBSCO worksheet

Lucy Drysdale and Louise Faustino

Did you know…? – Working on your thesis? Help is available

Here’s an outline of what help is available from the Library and IT Services for those of you working on your thesis.

Library help

Searching for theses in your subject area

You can access three large databases of theses through Primo:

  1. Sign in to Primo
  2. Click on the Find Databases tab
  3. From the left-hand menu, click on the arrow next to All General Resources
  4. Select Theses from the options below
  5. Then click on each database for more information and to link out and search for relevant theses.

For further information and more theses databases, please see this guidance document created by Library staff.

University of Aberdeen theses are also available in the Digital Collections section of Primo. There are both Research and Taught Course theses.

Information Skills

Our Find it Fast! Wiki is packed with material to help with your information skills, from planning your search to referencing. There are specific sections for Taught Postgraduates and Postgraduate Researchers

Live Q&A sessions for PGR students

Library staff will be running live Q&A sessions for PGR students next week on 21 & 24 June. Please do come along and our team will be happy to provide guidance and short demonstrations based on your needs. Sign up on the Course Booking site.

Remember we are here to support you throughout your studies, so please do get in touch (library@abdn.ac.uk) if you would like some help. 

IT help

The IT Services Team have created the Working with Long Documents section on Toolkit, which has plenty of handy videos and guides to help you with creating and manipulating long documents in MS Word.

The IT Services Training and Documentation team are also running sessions on 16 June:

  • Part 1: Adding Style to Your Thesis, 11am-12pm
  • Part 2: The Power of Section Breaks, 2pm-3pm

You can sign up on the Course Booking pages. Even if the session is full, it is worth getting on the waiting list as you may still be able to attend.

Best of luck to all those of you working on your thesis!

Did you Know…? – help with referencing

It’s not too early to start thinking about your referencing. Once you have researched and begun writing your dissertation or project you must remember to correctly acknowledge the sources of any information which you refer to. This allows readers to trace the original material while also ensuring that you avoid potentially committing plagiarism.  

To help you with your referencing, Library staff have prepared several online guides with useful examples. We have a generic guide on Referencing and Citing as well as others focused on specific referencing systems or subject areas:  

Please be sure, though, to also refer to any specific referencing guidance which you may have been provided by your department. You can also see advice on avoiding plagiarism on the Student Learning Service’s website and PGT students can also check in MyAberdeen for materials on academic writing and avoiding plagiarism. 

We also have access to a really useful book by Colin Neville called Complete guide to referencing and avoiding plagiarism which goes over topics from why you need to reference, where, the different referencing styles, plagiarism and how to express your own ideas in an assignment. 

If you need any help with referencing your dissertation or project please feel free to contact Library staff with any questions you may have.

VLeBooks Quick Guide

Did you know that a small number of e-books are available to us via the VLeBooks platform? These e-books are listed in Primo and require a Shibboleth login. Read on to find out how to access and use books on the VLeBooks platform.

Sign in to Primo and search for a title. If the book is available from VLeBooks, the following steps will apply:

In the book’s record, click on either the title of the book, or the Available Online link. You will be taken to the book’s details page:

In the View Online section click on the blue VLeBooks link. You may be asked to sign in with your University username and password.

Please note: if you didn’t sign in to Primo prior to your search, the following screen may appear:

Do Not Choose the above option. Instead, click on the Shibboleth option and on the next page type “Aberdeen” into the Find your institution box. Select University of Aberdeen. The University’s login screen will appear – log in as normal.

You will then be taken to the book’s details page:

Main options: Read Online & Download (equivalent to borrowing the book.)

If you choose to read online, you will see the below display:

To download: please ensure Adobe Digital Editions has been installed on your device. Instructions can be found at https://www.vlebooks.com/Vleweb/Help/DigitalEditions

The option for this item is to download for 1-3 days. Other items are avaliable for longer to download depending upon licence agreements.

Once the book has been downloaded, you can either choose to open it with ADE, or simply save the item to your desktop and then move it into your ADE Platform. Once it is displayed within ADE, you will be able to read it like an online book within the set time frame.

Additional Features

Help and Advice – Range of information on the “Help”icon on upper toolbar of VleBooks home screen with advice topics relating to downloading and reading a VLEbooks, and accessibility.

Accessibility Settings – ‘Edit Accessibility Settings’ are given throughout the site, above the link to ‘My Bookshelves.’ There are extensive options here to modify the display to suit your needs.

Also, within the book on the upper toolbar, you can change the background colour and choose the Read Aloud option using the icons at the top right hand of the screen. There is further information available from the ‘VLE Books Quick Reference Guide’, which is accessible through the question mark icon.

Adding Books to your Bookshelf  – Add directly from the title page, into named folders if required.

Download Citations – The “Download Citations” function on the book details page will download an RIS File to your device containing the reference details of the item. Please be aware that the RIS File cannot be directly exported to RefWorks or any other reference software from VLE Books. Further information and support in this can be found in our Library guides (https://www.abdn.ac.uk/library/support/library-guides-101.php#R)

Louise Faustino and Lucy Drysdale

Did you know…? – Off-campus access to OnePetro

OnePetro logo

In a previous post, we told you about accessing e-resources off-campus. In this post, we would like to draw your attention to OnePetro, an important database of technical literature for the oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) industry.

The Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), who own the OnePetro database, have an authentication (login) system based on the IP address of the user’s PC. Signing in is very straightforward when users are on-campus using University networked PCs. However, it is a 2-step process when off-campus, as users are required to come into the Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) first so that their personal device will look as if it is campus-based.

Please follow the guidance on the Remote Access section of Toolkit – select the Remote VDI link in the ‘Guides’ section. Once you have logged in to the VDI, navigate to ‘Library Resources’, and from there to Primo.

Library staff have created a very useful guide on accessing and using OnePetro.

Please note that via the VDI you can also access classroom software associated with your login details and your H: drive.

Susan McCourt, Elaine Fitzgerald, Lena Papadakou

Did you Know…? – help with referencing

Once you have researched and begun writing your dissertation or project you must remember to correctly acknowledge the sources of any information which you refer to, as this allows readers to trace the original material while also ensuring that you avoid potentially committing plagiarism. 

To help you with your referencing, Library staff have prepared several online guides with useful examples. We have a generic guide on Referencing and Citing as well as others focused on specific referencing systems or subject areas: 

Please be sure, though, to also refer to any specific referencing guidance which you may have been provided by your department. You can also see advice on avoiding plagiarism on the Student Learning Service’s website.  

If you are looking for a tool to help you organise your references and also produce your bibliography, then why not create a free account with RefWorks, an online reference management tool that the University of Aberdeen subscribes to. For more information and instructions on how to create an account please check our quick library guide to RefWorks

If you need any help with referencing your dissertation or project please do contact Library staff

Did you know…? – routes for off-campus access to e-resources

computer

To access the databases and e-book collections that the University of Aberdeen subscribes to you must prove that you are a member of the university. Most resources require a Shibboleth/institutional login, while for others authentication is via IP address (the provider is looking at the physical location of the computer you are using).

Off-campus access information for databases requiring an institutional login (most databases)

To access these resources, use the Find Databases option in Primo. Remember to sign in to Primo before you do any searching. When working off-campus, you may be asked to sign in to a resource via your institution, in which case you must select ‘UK Access Management Federation’. Then select ‘University of Aberdeen’ and lastly, enter your computer username and password.

Off-campus access information for databases requiring an IP address authentication (e.g. OnePetro, Kluwer Arbitration)

To access these resources off-campus, you must use the university’s Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI). This makes your device look as if it is a campus-based device. Via the VDI you can also access classroom software associated with your login details and your H: drive.

For Instructions on how to use the VDI see our Remote Access section on Toolkit – www.abdn.ac.uk/toolkit/

Useful information

  • To check the authentication route for a database, type its name into the Find Databases search box in Primo, then click on ‘Available Online’. This will take you to the database’s information page
  • A very small selection of academic databases require a special username and password. A list of usernames and passwords for those resources can be found on this password-protected page
  • Please see our Library guide QG DBS005: Accessing Electronic Information

Questions?

For subject-related enquiries, please get in touch with the Information Consultant for your subject. Details can be found at https://bit.ly/InfoConsultants  

For IT-related queries contact the IT Service Desk:
servicedesk@abdn.ac.uk
https://uoa.freshservice.com/support/home

 

Search our digital collections using ‘Find Databases’ on Primo

Primo will tell you about the hundreds of thousands of digital resources available through the University and will link you to one of over 200 different online academic databases to let you read the material that you’re interested in.

Did you know, though, that if you go straight to the website of specific academic databases you can perform even more powerful searches, often looking across every word contained in every item within that collection? A simple search in Primo is the best place to start a piece of research but using the Find Databases option is the next step, improving the quality of any academic research that you do.

These databases often focus on specific subject areas, meaning that your searching becomes more focused and efficient, saving you time looking and giving you more time to read and write. See below for details of how to use the Find Databases feature in Primo to link straight to digital collections best suited to your area of study.

find-dbs-screen-2

Use the Find Databases option at the top of Primo. Please remember to log in with your username and password.

find-dbs-screen-1

You can search for specific databases or you can filter by subject area. It is also possible to browse an alphabetical listing of all databases available.

Once you have identified an academic database that you wish to search, simply click on its name to link out to it. You may be asked to log in again.

Please note that it is not possible to search across multiple databases at once using the Find Databases option. You must link out to each database that you are interested in and search them individually. This method will allow you to perform the most powerful searches available to you.

For further guidance on using Primo please see our short videos on its various features. For guidance on accessing online resources, particularly when off campus, please see our Library Guide on Accessing Electronic Information and the Toolkit’s section on Remote Access.

Ewan Grant, e.grant@abdn.ac.uk

Primo videos

Need help with using Primo? Watch our videos and discover how to use Primo, the Library’s discovery tool, to find specific books or books on a topic. Our videos also cover journal searches and the processes of planning and executing a search.  More videos to follow soon!  

Our videos can be accessed at www.abdn.ac.uk/library/support/information-skills-179.php#panel547.

Please email eleni.boro@abdn.ac.uk or e.grant@abdn.ac.uk if you have any questions!  

 

Eleni Borompoka, eleni.boro@abdn.ac.uk