Celebrating Neurodiversity: Resources Available in the Library

As part of the University of Aberdeen’s support for Neurodiversity Celebration Week (March 15-21), the Library would like to highlight materials from our collection that contain a wealth of resources and research on neurodiversity and its impact.

Neurodiversity Celebration Week Graphic

Neurodiversity describes the many different ways that our brains can work and how we interpret information and see the world around us.You may also have friends and family who have conditions that come under this umbrella term. These include:

  • Autism
  • Dyslexia
  • Dyspraxia
  • ADHD

You may already be aware of the challenges that these conditions can pose, and unfortunately, the misconceptions that society has regarding them. However, they can also be a source of several strengths for individuals and collectively produce new and innovative products, services and research.

Neurodiversity

There are several perspectives on how different sectors of society work with neurodiversity and neurodiverse groups. In education, the following authors seek to empower and equip students and staff:

Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to help Students with Special Needs succeed in School and Life by Thomas Armstrong: This book takes an in-depth look at all aspects of neurodiversity, examining the conditions and highlighting the unique strengths that individuals can have, particularly spotlighting notable people who have achieved lasting recognition.

The Adolescent and Adult Neuro-diversity Handbook: Asperger’s Syndrome, ADHD, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and Related Conditions by S Hendrickx: Aimed at young people and adults who may not have been formally diagnosed, but wish to know more about the range of conditions,their implications and get some advice regarding coping strategies.

Current Issues in Developmental Disorders by Chloe Marshall: Covering a range of conditions both on the neurodiversity spectrum and ‘syndromic conditions’ like Down’s syndrome, Marshall explores contemporary research in developmental psychology across all these conditions, seeking to understand the neurological bases of neurodivergence.

Ethics and Neurodiversity by C.D Herrera: In strongly challenging the view that neurodivergent individuals are not eligible for civil rights, Herrera’s work fully examines the moral and legal framework of society and where and how it needs to change.

Neurodiverse be the Policymakers! A Study Exploring News Text Informed Potential for Anxiety-Enhanced Policymaking and Guiding the Progressive Reporting of Mental Diversity by Damian Mellifont: This article explores the possibilities for a truly creative approach to Australia’s national mental-health policy and solving the social issues surrounding it-involving neurodiverse people in generating ideas for policy through harnessing their experiences and the grass-roots campaigning they’re largely involved in, as well as providing a framework for progressive journalism around the subject.

Autism & ADHD

Autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are common conditions: with approximately 4% of people having ADHD and 2% diagnosed with Autism. (Source: Neurodiversity Celebration Week.)

People with autism and ADHD are widely considered to be highly logical, extremely detail-oriented, energetic and focused.

Autism in the Workplace: Creating Positive Employment and Career Outcomes for Generation A by Amy Hurley-Hanson: Focusing on the needs of those with ‘Autism Spectrum Disorders’ (ASD) in employment, this book strives to provide a detailed practical framework for employers, employees and educational institutions to ensure successful work experiences and careers.

Autistic Community and the Neurodiversity Movement: An overview of the history of autism rights campaigning, which critically examines the developments in perceptions of autism, the successes of particular advocacy work, and how individuals have influenced the neurodiversity movement.

The Dysregulated Adult Integrated Treatment Approaches by Georgia DeGangi: Focusing on a wide range of conditions, this item is a strong overview of diagnostic tools and checklists, including for autism and ADHD, that focuses on the medical side of treatments and managing the conditions.

Human Behaviour, Learning and the Developing Brain: Atypical Development by Donna Coch et al: Looking at some of the psychological and behavioural developments that underpin and define the various conditions, this gives an understanding into different medical theories on the subject.

Dyslexia & Dyspraxia

10% of the population are dyslexic, meaning that they are creative, dynamic problem solvers & storytellers. Similarly, 6% are dyspraxic, and thus are highly likely to be determined and strategic. (Source: Neurodiversity Celebration Week)

Living with Dyspraxia: A Guide for Adults with Developmental Dyspraxia by Mary Colley et al: Written with the insight of someone with dyspraxia who campaigns for support and inclusion, this gives a good grounding into the challenges faced by people with dyspraxia in daily life.

Dyslexia Included: A Whole School Approach by Michael Thomson: Based on the experiences of educators at a specialist school, this volume offers a range of tried and tested strategies and a wealth of advice for teachers in order to best help students.

Making Dyslexia Work for You by Vicki Goodwin: In a more user-focused approach, this book encourages the reader to put together their own ‘support package’: ideas, strategies and coping mechanisms that work for them in managing dyslexia.

More Information and Support

The University of Aberdeen is committed to providing a welcoming, secure and inclusive environment to all students, staff and visitors. The University’s Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Team offer a plethora of information, training resources and links to support, student organisations and both staff and student networks across diversity and equality issues. More information and contact details for EDI are available from the University website .

Lucy Drysdale

Search our digital collections using ‘Find Databases’ on Primo

Primo will tell you about the hundreds of thousands of digital resources available through the University and will link you to one of over 200 different online academic databases to let you read the material that you’re interested in.

Did you know, though, that if you go straight to the website of specific academic databases you can perform even more powerful searches, often looking across every word contained in every item within that collection? A simple search in Primo is the best place to start a piece of research but using the Find Databases option is the next step, improving the quality of any academic research that you do.

These databases often focus on specific subject areas, meaning that your searching becomes more focused and efficient, saving you time looking and giving you more time to read and write. See below for details of how to use the Find Databases feature in Primo to link straight to digital collections best suited to your area of study.

find-dbs-screen-2

Use the Find Databases option at the top of Primo. Please remember to log in with your username and password.

find-dbs-screen-1

You can search for specific databases or you can filter by subject area. It is also possible to browse an alphabetical listing of all databases available.

Once you have identified an academic database that you wish to search, simply click on its name to link out to it. You may be asked to log in again.

Please note that it is not possible to search across multiple databases at once using the Find Databases option. You must link out to each database that you are interested in and search them individually. This method will allow you to perform the most powerful searches available to you.

For further guidance on using Primo please see our short videos on its various features. For guidance on accessing online resources, particularly when off campus, please see our Library Guide on Accessing Electronic Information and the Toolkit’s section on Remote Access.

Ewan Grant, e.grant@abdn.ac.uk

Did you know…? – The Teaching Resource Collection

TRC Roald Dahl

Did you know about the Teaching Resource Collection (TRC) on Floor 6 of The Sir Duncan Rice Library? The collection contains resources for our Education students to use for preparation and whilst on teaching placements.

There is a wide selection of resources including children’s books, school textbooks, kits, posters, big books and DVDs. Favourites, among many others, include the Gruffalo storysack, the Magnetism compendium kit and books by Roald Dahl.

Group discussion is allowed in this room and there are 3 small group tables. No need to book!

If you would like any help using the TRC, please ask Floor 6 staff (currently Jenna, Elaine and our Information Consultant for Education, Claire Molloy).

For further information on finding teaching resources, check out our guide: www.abdn.ac.uk/library/documents/guides/ugedu005.pdf.

For more useful library tips, keep an eye out for our Did You Know…? blog posts next week.

Elaine Fitzgerald, e.fitzgerald@abdn.ac.uk

Search our digital collections using Find Databases on Primo

Primo will tell you about the hundreds of thousands of digital resources available through the University and will link you to one of over 200 different online academic databases to let you read the material that you’re interested in.

Did you know, though, that if you go straight to the website of specific academic databases you can perform even more powerful searches, often looking across every word contained in every item within that collection? A simple search in Primo is the best place to start a piece of research but using the Find Databases option is the next step, improving the quality of any academic research that you do.

These databases often focus on specific subject areas, meaning that your searching becomes more focused and efficient, saving you time looking and giving you more time to read and write. See below for details of how to use the Find Databases feature in Primo to link straight to digital collections best suited to your area of study.

Use the Find Databases option at the top of Primo. Please remember to login with your username and password.
You can search for specific databases or you can filter by subject area. It is also possible to browse an alphabetical listing of all databases available.

Once you have identified an academic database that you wish to search simply click on its name to link out to it. You may be asked to log in again.

Please note that it is not possible to search across multiple databases at once using this Find Databases option. You must link out to each database that you are interested in and search them individually. This method will allow you to perform the most powerful searches available to you.

For further guidance on using Primo please see our short videos on its various features. For guidance on accessing online resources, particularly when off campus, please see our Library Guide on Accessing Electronic Information and the Toolkit’s section on Remote Access.

Ewan Grant, e.grant@abdn.ac.uk

Heavy Demand collection

Heavy Demand Books – a Quick Guide 

So, you’ve found a book on Primo that you need to borrow and it’s in Heavy Demand. Here are some helpful hints about borrowing Heavy Demand books to get you started! 

The Heavy Demand Collection is located on the first floor next to the Information Centre desk.  

Heavy Demand books can be borrowed at any time and are always due back the following day at 10.30am (or on Monday if borrowed on Friday/Saturday), other than those in the 3-Hour Reference section. 

You can borrow up to 2 items at a time and are welcome to place bookings on copies up to 21 days in advance through Primo. Just remember to collect your reservation by 3.30pm, or your booking will lapse. 

Don’t forget! With high demand comes high fine rates – make sure to return your Heavy Demand books on time to avoid the 75p hourly fine per item.  

In the Heavy Demand area you can use the self-service kiosks to pay fines, borrow and return books all in one place! Always check your receipt when borrowing before 10.30am, as pre-booked items may be due back the same day.  

Our DVD collection is also located here – these are mainly 3-day loans although a small number are Heavy Demand.  

Any questions? Library staff are always happy to help! 

Olivia McIntosh, olivia.mcintosh@abdn.ac.uk

Come for a Tour of The Sir Duncan Rice Library – No booking required

Following on from our already fully-booked Library Tours, which will take place on September 4 and 5, we will be running open tours of The Sir Duncan Rice Library over the rest of that week and the following two weeks for all students, new and old. This is to make sure that as many people as possible get the chance to learn about the Library.

small library tours sign cropped

Starting on Wednesday September 6 and running until Friday September 22, come and meet staff on the ground floor of the library at 10am or 2pm. There is no need to book a place and each tour group will contain a maximum of ten people.

There will be more than one tour taking place at a time, lasting approximately 30 minutes. The tours by our friendly staff will introduce you to not only the beautiful building, but also the services available from the library. We will also tell you:

  • How materials are organised in the building
  • How to begin borrowing the library books on your reading lists
  • How library staff can help you during your time at The University of Aberdeen

Please note that there will be no tours taking place at the weekends, but staff working then will still be happy to answer any questions you may have about the Library Service.

Please speak with staff in the Taylor and Medical Libraries for help in finding your way round their collections and spaces.

We look forward to showing you around, and also take this opportunity to wish you all good luck with the year ahead.​​

Browse the Sir Duncan Rice Library new books webpages

New books are always being added to the collections here in The Sir Duncan Rice Library and to keep up to date with the titles which are arriving we encourage you to take a look at our New Acquisitions webpages.

These pages are updated at the end of each month, and include title information and links to their entries in Primo, the portal to details of all our Library materials.

Selected highlights, amongst many others from the past month include:

Bookmark this page on the Library website or sign up to this blog on the right of this page to receive announcements every month of the new material we are continually adding to what is already over 15 miles of shelving in this library alone.

And, of course, the Taylor Library and the Medical Library also maintain similar pages detailing the new book stock which they receive each month, so that whatever subject you are studying, teaching, or researching you are always aware of the new material available to you through the University of Aberdeen Libraries.

 

UPDATE: Stock move – Floor 5

All the trolleys are gone! We’ve completed the stock move on Floor 5 of The Sir Duncan Rice Library in advance of the start of the teaching term as planned.

The History & Philosophy of Science sequence (books with the prefix Sc in the shelf mark) now appear directly after the Reference sequence (books with the prefix Ref in the shelf mark). Labelling on the ends of the shelves has been updated but if you have any difficulties finding relevant books please speak with Eleni or Vivien on Floor 5.

Eleni Papadakou (e.papadakou@abdn.ac.uk) & Vivien Logan (v.logan@abdn.ac.uk)

INFO: Library – stock move (Floor 5)

As there are fewer students than normal in The Sir Duncan Rice Library at this time of the year we’re undertaking some book moves on Floor 5. Work will start on Thursday 7 January and will be finished well in advance of the start of term (Monday 18 January).

During the move a portion of the stock will be stored on trolleys on the floor. If you have any difficulties finding relevant books, or want to know more about what we’re doing (and why!), just speak with Eleni or Vivien on Floor 5.

Eleni Papadakou (e.papadakou@abdn.ac.uk) & Vivien Logan (v.logan@abdn.ac.uk)

Primo – how to find academic databases for your subject

In this post in our short series looking at Primo, our resource discovery tool here at the UoA, we are focusing on how you can select the academic databases which are most appropriate for the subjects you may currently be revising before the exams begin in December.

Academic databases contain high-quality scholarly level resources not freely available on the internet and, to ensure you are reading all the best materials available to you, you will need to make use of these collections, but as there are approximately 200 different academic databases to choose from it can be tough to know which ones to use. Well, read on to find out how you can easily narrow that number down to just those databases most suitable for you.

It is possible to carry out very basic searches across some of these 200 databases directly from in Primo, but definitely not all of them and we do not recommend doing so. Instead, we strongly encourage you to link out to particular databases and perform searches directly on their sites as the searches you can do there will be much more powerful.

1 – To begin go to Primo at http://primo.abdn.ac.uk 

 

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2 – Once at Primo we would always recommend logging in so that you can link out to electronic materials, including academic databases, and use all of the features available in Primo.

 

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3 – You will need to enter your UoA username and password.

 

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4 – Once logged in you will see your own name at the top of the screen. Now select Find Databases from the top of the screen.

 

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5 – A new window will open. In this example we will look for those databases most appropriate for those studying or researching Education.

  • Click drop-down arrow next to Category and select Social Sciences
  • Click drop-down arrow next to Sub-category and select Education
  • Click Find Databases
  • A list of 49 possible databases is generated in this example.
  • To find out more about each databases click Show Info

Once you become familiar with which databases you should use you can easily navigate to them alphabetically or search for them by name in this Find Databases window.

 

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6 – Having clicked Show Info you can see:

  • Details of subjects covered in the database
  • Search rules for the particular database
  • Other information about that database

Of the 49 databases in this particular list some will be heavily focused upon Education and others will focus less on the subject while still containing useful material. Using the Show Info option will really help you select the most appropriate databases. You will need to search multiple databases to find suitable resources.

 

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7 – To access a particular database click the name of the database with the right mouse button and select Open link in a new tab. Using the right mouse button means the database will open correctly. You may be asked to log in again to access the e-book collection.

 

For more details on accessing electronic resources, particularly when off campus, see our library guide.

Further information on using Primo can be found in our online library guide.

To see our full range of library guides click here.

Also, don’t forget that library staff are here to help you locate any materials you may be having trouble locating.

Good luck with your exams