Did you know…? – Extensive online access to publications from the British Academy

We thought you might be interested in additional e-resources from the British Academy that have been made available through our subscription to University Press Scholarship Online (UPSO). Recently expanded content includes 207 publications, spanning subjects in the humanities and social sciences, with new items being added as they are published.

Logo of the University Press Scholarship Online and the British Academy

Access to this electronic collection of books, essays and journals includes the series Proceedings of the British Academy, lectures delivered at the British Academy, available online from 2002 onwards.

The Library also has earlier and current print copies of this journal on Floor 2 of The Sir Duncan Rice Library and at other locations.

Access to UPSO is via the Find Databases tab in Primo. Once you are on the UPSO platform, please look for the Sign in via your Institution option.

Details of other collections that remain available on a temporary basis can be found on our designated Library page, which we update regularly.

In addition to highlighting expanded content available via our Library subscriptions, please see here a list of relevant and appropriate Open Access e-resources.

Please email us with any questions you may have as we are always happy to help!
subjectteam@abdn.ac.uk

Jenna Storey, jennifer.storey@abdn.ac.uk

Using The Sir Duncan Rice Library Safely During the Pandemic

The Sir Duncan Rice Library and the Medical and Taylor Libraries are currently open for our students and staff. We are unable to provide library access to members of the public.

Remember to bring your staff/student card as access will be via swipe card at the main entrance. Card scanning at the security gates is compulsory to comply with current Government Test and Protect obligations.

Please be aware that a face covering must be worn at all times, including when seated, or display a sunflower lanyard if unable to do so.
Please maintain the 2 metre physical distancing rule whenever possible.
Sanitise hands on entry and exit and during your stay.  
Only use study spaces and PCs marked with a green tick and surfaces, PCs and MFDs should be cleaned after use with the wipes provided.
Please also remember that no food or drink, other than bottled water, is permitted anywhere within the library, except when seated in the café.
If a book from the shelf is handled but not borrowed – the quarantine trolleys on each floor next to the atrium must be used.
Follow the designated one-way routes and please remember, lifts are to be used by one person at a time, so please leave more time to move around the building.

Please only approach Library Staff who are seated behind support desk screens.

We continue to welcome all University users who have no suitable alternative study space available to them. If a user is unable to evacuate unaided, we require prior arrangement before we can allow access – please contact libnotice@abdn.ac.uk for assistance.

A Click and Collect service is available through Primo, for those who prefer not to come into the library at present. This is a next day service and is available Monday to Friday. An email notification is issued when the requested items are available for collection. You can find more information about the Click & Collect service here.

Please note these guidelines are subject to change according to the guidance provided by the Scottish Government. Thank you for helping to keep our Libraries and Community safe.

Olivia McIntosh & Mhorag Watson

REMINDER: live Q&A sessions – Library resources and services

Just a reminder that we still offer online Q&A sessions about the Library’s resources and services. Our next sessions are scheduled for Thursday 6 May at 11:00 and Thursday 13 May at 10:00.

Come along to one of our sessions and you will be able to ask us any questions you may have. All levels of student are welcome!

The sessions are delivered via Collaborate. To find out more and to book a place, please visit abdn.ac.uk/coursebooking and change the category to ‘Library Information Skills’.

Please contact us if you have any queries:
eleni.boro@abdn.ac.uk
s.mccourt@abdn.ac.uk

Friday 30 April: IT issues

An unexpected loss of power within our data centre on campus means many of our IT-services will not operate as expected, or potentially at all. The University website, library journals and MyAberdeen are just some of the services that will be affected. Cloud-based services such as Microsoft 365 and Microsoft Teams should be unaffected. The process to restart the power centre is already under way but this is extensive and could take up to five hours to complete.

We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

VLeBooks Quick Guide

Did you know that a small number of e-books are available to us via the VLeBooks platform? These e-books are listed in Primo and require a Shibboleth login. Read on to find out how to access and use books on the VLeBooks platform.

Sign in to Primo and search for a title. If the book is available from VLeBooks, the following steps will apply:

In the book’s record, click on either the title of the book, or the Available Online link. You will be taken to the book’s details page:

In the View Online section click on the blue VLeBooks link. You may be asked to sign in with your University username and password.

Please note: if you didn’t sign in to Primo prior to your search, the following screen may appear:

Do Not Choose the above option. Instead, click on the Shibboleth option and on the next page type “Aberdeen” into the Find your institution box. Select University of Aberdeen. The University’s login screen will appear – log in as normal.

You will then be taken to the book’s details page:

Main options: Read Online & Download (equivalent to borrowing the book.)

If you choose to read online, you will see the below display:

To download: please ensure Adobe Digital Editions has been installed on your device. Instructions can be found at https://www.vlebooks.com/Vleweb/Help/DigitalEditions

The option for this item is to download for 1-3 days. Other items are avaliable for longer to download depending upon licence agreements.

Once the book has been downloaded, you can either choose to open it with ADE, or simply save the item to your desktop and then move it into your ADE Platform. Once it is displayed within ADE, you will be able to read it like an online book within the set time frame.

Additional Features

Help and Advice – Range of information on the “Help”icon on upper toolbar of VleBooks home screen with advice topics relating to downloading and reading a VLEbooks, and accessibility.

Accessibility Settings – ‘Edit Accessibility Settings’ are given throughout the site, above the link to ‘My Bookshelves.’ There are extensive options here to modify the display to suit your needs.

Also, within the book on the upper toolbar, you can change the background colour and choose the Read Aloud option using the icons at the top right hand of the screen. There is further information available from the ‘VLE Books Quick Reference Guide’, which is accessible through the question mark icon.

Adding Books to your Bookshelf  – Add directly from the title page, into named folders if required.

Download Citations – The “Download Citations” function on the book details page will download an RIS File to your device containing the reference details of the item. Please be aware that the RIS File cannot be directly exported to RefWorks or any other reference software from VLE Books. Further information and support in this can be found in our Library guides (https://www.abdn.ac.uk/library/support/library-guides-101.php#R)

Louise Faustino and Lucy Drysdale

Important changes to Library service

We are pleased to announce that from Monday 26 April, as Scotland moves to Level 3 restrictions, we will be extending opening hours at The Sir Duncan Rice Library and the Medical Library (Foresterhill campus). Also, the Taylor Library will be reopening.

The Sir Duncan Rice Library and the Taylor and Medical libraries will all be open for our students and staff:

  • Monday-Friday 09:00-20:00
  • Saturday & Sunday13:00-17:00

Wolfson Reading Room to re-open

From 26 April we will also be able to offer research access, on an appointment only basis, to University of Aberdeen staff and students. For more details, please see https://bit.ly/2QNtHs4.

Hardback Café

As of Monday 26 April the Hardback Café in The Sir Duncan Rice Library will also be open Monday-Thursday 10:30-19:00 and Friday 10:30-17:00.

Further changes

Service changes will also see an increase in seating capacity at all library sites. Access to bookshelves will also be restored. Please note that Floor 1 of The Sir Duncan Rice Library will continue to be kept free of study spaces. Study spaces will be available from floors 2 through to 7.

Our Click and Collect service will continue.

All Covid safety rules remain in place, including the wearing of face coverings at all times and a restricted number of study spaces.

If you do visit our libraries, please be aware that all the rules we put in place in 2020 still apply. These measures exist to ensure that we are keeping both you and our staff safe. Support us by taking time to read them and please observe the rules without requiring Library staff to remind you. 

Further information and FAQs can be found on our Coronavirus and Library Services webpage.

New Open Access Publisher Agreements available

The Scholarly Communications team are pleased to announce that we have added Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press to our publisher open access agreements. Corresponding authors at the University of Aberdeen can publish research and review articles open access in participating journals at no cost. Please see our webpages or contact openaccess@abdn.ac.uk for more information.

Celebrating Neurodiversity: Resources Available in the Library

As part of the University of Aberdeen’s support for Neurodiversity Celebration Week (March 15-21), the Library would like to highlight materials from our collection that contain a wealth of resources and research on neurodiversity and its impact.

Neurodiversity Celebration Week Graphic

Neurodiversity describes the many different ways that our brains can work and how we interpret information and see the world around us.You may also have friends and family who have conditions that come under this umbrella term. These include:

  • Autism
  • Dyslexia
  • Dyspraxia
  • ADHD

You may already be aware of the challenges that these conditions can pose, and unfortunately, the misconceptions that society has regarding them. However, they can also be a source of several strengths for individuals and collectively produce new and innovative products, services and research.

Neurodiversity

There are several perspectives on how different sectors of society work with neurodiversity and neurodiverse groups. In education, the following authors seek to empower and equip students and staff:

Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to help Students with Special Needs succeed in School and Life by Thomas Armstrong: This book takes an in-depth look at all aspects of neurodiversity, examining the conditions and highlighting the unique strengths that individuals can have, particularly spotlighting notable people who have achieved lasting recognition.

The Adolescent and Adult Neuro-diversity Handbook: Asperger’s Syndrome, ADHD, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and Related Conditions by S Hendrickx: Aimed at young people and adults who may not have been formally diagnosed, but wish to know more about the range of conditions,their implications and get some advice regarding coping strategies.

Current Issues in Developmental Disorders by Chloe Marshall: Covering a range of conditions both on the neurodiversity spectrum and ‘syndromic conditions’ like Down’s syndrome, Marshall explores contemporary research in developmental psychology across all these conditions, seeking to understand the neurological bases of neurodivergence.

Ethics and Neurodiversity by C.D Herrera: In strongly challenging the view that neurodivergent individuals are not eligible for civil rights, Herrera’s work fully examines the moral and legal framework of society and where and how it needs to change.

Neurodiverse be the Policymakers! A Study Exploring News Text Informed Potential for Anxiety-Enhanced Policymaking and Guiding the Progressive Reporting of Mental Diversity by Damian Mellifont: This article explores the possibilities for a truly creative approach to Australia’s national mental-health policy and solving the social issues surrounding it-involving neurodiverse people in generating ideas for policy through harnessing their experiences and the grass-roots campaigning they’re largely involved in, as well as providing a framework for progressive journalism around the subject.

Autism & ADHD

Autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are common conditions: with approximately 4% of people having ADHD and 2% diagnosed with Autism. (Source: Neurodiversity Celebration Week.)

People with autism and ADHD are widely considered to be highly logical, extremely detail-oriented, energetic and focused.

Autism in the Workplace: Creating Positive Employment and Career Outcomes for Generation A by Amy Hurley-Hanson: Focusing on the needs of those with ‘Autism Spectrum Disorders’ (ASD) in employment, this book strives to provide a detailed practical framework for employers, employees and educational institutions to ensure successful work experiences and careers.

Autistic Community and the Neurodiversity Movement: An overview of the history of autism rights campaigning, which critically examines the developments in perceptions of autism, the successes of particular advocacy work, and how individuals have influenced the neurodiversity movement.

The Dysregulated Adult Integrated Treatment Approaches by Georgia DeGangi: Focusing on a wide range of conditions, this item is a strong overview of diagnostic tools and checklists, including for autism and ADHD, that focuses on the medical side of treatments and managing the conditions.

Human Behaviour, Learning and the Developing Brain: Atypical Development by Donna Coch et al: Looking at some of the psychological and behavioural developments that underpin and define the various conditions, this gives an understanding into different medical theories on the subject.

Dyslexia & Dyspraxia

10% of the population are dyslexic, meaning that they are creative, dynamic problem solvers & storytellers. Similarly, 6% are dyspraxic, and thus are highly likely to be determined and strategic. (Source: Neurodiversity Celebration Week)

Living with Dyspraxia: A Guide for Adults with Developmental Dyspraxia by Mary Colley et al: Written with the insight of someone with dyspraxia who campaigns for support and inclusion, this gives a good grounding into the challenges faced by people with dyspraxia in daily life.

Dyslexia Included: A Whole School Approach by Michael Thomson: Based on the experiences of educators at a specialist school, this volume offers a range of tried and tested strategies and a wealth of advice for teachers in order to best help students.

Making Dyslexia Work for You by Vicki Goodwin: In a more user-focused approach, this book encourages the reader to put together their own ‘support package’: ideas, strategies and coping mechanisms that work for them in managing dyslexia.

More Information and Support

The University of Aberdeen is committed to providing a welcoming, secure and inclusive environment to all students, staff and visitors. The University’s Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Team offer a plethora of information, training resources and links to support, student organisations and both staff and student networks across diversity and equality issues. More information and contact details for EDI are available from the University website .

Lucy Drysdale

Live Q&A sessions: Library resources and services

Issues or difficulties when looking for material to support your research? If the answer is yes, come along to one of our online Q&A sessions starting this week. You will be able to ask us any questions you may have and we’ll do our best to answer them. All levels of student are welcome.

The sessions will be delivered via Collaborate. To find out more and to book a place, please visit: abdn.ac.uk/coursebooking and change the category to ‘Library Information Skills’.

Please contact us if you have any queries
eleni.boro@abdn.ac.uk
s.mccourt@abdn.ac.uk

04 February: Time to Talk Day

Today is Time to Talk Day – a day when everyone is encouraged to have a conversation about mental health. This year’s focus is on the power of small. However you have a conversation about mental health, whether it’s a quick message to a colleague, a virtual coffee morning, or a socially distanced walk and talk, it’s the small gestures that have the power to make a big difference.

See Me Scotland’s interactive bingo is full of ideas on how to start a mental health conversation. Click here to access it and share with your colleagues. How many can you tick off?

We want everyone at the University to feel they can be open about their mental health and ask for support if they need it. For information about the student counselling service and other support available for students please click here. For information about Care First and other support available for staff please click here.