Elsevier negotiations: update

Previously we told you about the University’s role in the negotiations with Elsevier.

Visit our new page to find out about the most recent developments and get answers on the following questions:

  • What will happen as December approaches?
  • What costs are incurred for authors at UoA?
  • Can we find an alternative, sustainable method of open access publishing?
  • What is Aberdeen University’s contribution in the negotiations process?

Jisc has produced the following video to highlight the key issues:

Elsevier Negotiations at University of Aberdeen

With our current Elsevier contract due to end in December 2021, the University is working with partners across the UK to negotiate a new multiyear agreement for access to Elsevier ScienceDirect which also includes open publishing.

To achieve an affordable and sustainable deal which aligns with Aberdeen 2040 and our commitment to open research and inclusivity, we need to take a clear and firm stance ensuring that our needs are properly reflected.

We are now gathering information in support of planning and analysis to inform an institutional response to negotiations. Simon Bains, University Librarian, is very happy to hear views and questions from researchers at all levels and also invites interest in joining a consultative group to respond to developments in the negotiations and assist in communicating updates across the University. See his recent invitation in the Staff Newsletter.

Watch a short video on Open Access agreements: Jisc and Elsevier negotiations:

Did you know…? – Extensive online access to publications from the British Academy

We thought you might be interested in additional e-resources from the British Academy that have been made available through our subscription to University Press Scholarship Online (UPSO). Recently expanded content includes 207 publications, spanning subjects in the humanities and social sciences, with new items being added as they are published.

Logo of the University Press Scholarship Online and the British Academy

Access to this electronic collection of books, essays and journals includes the series Proceedings of the British Academy, lectures delivered at the British Academy, available online from 2002 onwards.

The Library also has earlier and current print copies of this journal on Floor 2 of The Sir Duncan Rice Library and at other locations.

Access to UPSO is via the Find Databases tab in Primo. Once you are on the UPSO platform, please look for the Sign in via your Institution option.

Details of other collections that remain available on a temporary basis can be found on our designated Library page, which we update regularly.

In addition to highlighting expanded content available via our Library subscriptions, please see here a list of relevant and appropriate Open Access e-resources.

Please email us with any questions you may have as we are always happy to help!
subjectteam@abdn.ac.uk

Jenna Storey, jennifer.storey@abdn.ac.uk

New Open Access Publisher Agreements available

The Scholarly Communications team are pleased to announce that we have added Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press to our publisher open access agreements. Corresponding authors at the University of Aberdeen can publish research and review articles open access in participating journals at no cost. Please see our webpages or contact openaccess@abdn.ac.uk for more information.

Jisc Survey on Open Access Book Publishing – Have your say!

Jisc’s Open research team is carrying out a survey to gather the views and opinions of academics regarding the open access publishing of books (including book chapters and edited collections). We’re keen to find out about:

  • Your publishing habits and motivations
  • How you regard open access book publishing considering the benefits and any concerns you foresee

The survey will take around 10-15 minutes to complete. If you would like to participate, please visit: https://bit.ly/33Bf5jk

Please contact Joanna Adams, Scholarly Communications Officer, with any questions you may have.

Wednesday Information Sessions from the Scholarly Communications Team

What is Scholarly Communications?

Wednesday 18 November at 14:00 will give an overview of our services and provide information on how we can help you navigate the process of making your research open access.

Introduction to Open Research on Wednesday 25 November at 14:00 will  provide advice, guidance and support to help you make your research open. This session will give an overview of our services and what you can do to improve open access to your research. 

Aimed at academic staff and postgraduate researchers the sessions will be delivered via Teams and are available on the course-booking system. To book a place, please visit: https://www.abdn.ac.uk/coursebooking – select category ‘Library and Information Skills’.

For more information, please contact Joanna Adams: openaccess@abdn.ac.uk

Update to the Jisc Wiley Open Access Publishing Agreement

Funds in the Jisc Wiley Open Access Agreement have been exhausted for 2020. The agreement will reopen in January 2021. Articles submitted for publication in Wiley subscription journals should be published under the standard licence to publish; taking the green open access route to deposit the accepted manuscript in Pure/AURA. For fully open access journals please ensure that there is funding available before submitting a paper. Should funding be secured a 25% discount is available – please contact openaccess@abdn.ac.uk for the promotional code. Further information is available on our webpages or contact Joanna Adams, Scholarly Communications Officer.

Did you know…? Digital Research Services

Digital Research Services supports researchers at the University of Aberdeen throughout the life cycle of their research projects, from conception to archive. We can support you with IT or data-related queries including but not restricted to those about hardware, software, cloud services, data management (including analysis, data management plans, meta data, protection, and storage). Contact us via digitalresearch@abdn.ac.uk.

Find out more about IT for Researchers at https://www.abdn.ac.uk/toolkit/services/it-researchers/

#OAWeek

Baffled by REF?

Do you have a paper accepted for publication? Are you unsure about how to comply with REF2021 requirements? Unsure about Green and Gold Open Access?

Have no fear, we’re here to help!

WHAT TO DO?

If you have a paper accepted for publication, congratulations! The next steps are:

  • Forward the acceptance letter and the unformatted manuscript, as accepted by the publisher, to paperaccepted@abdn.ac.uk
  • We will deposit the accepted manuscript into Pure/AURA, making sure that we comply with both the REF and any publisher embargo policies.
  • This must be done within 3 months of the acceptance date for REF requirements.

If you are unsure at any point then ask us! We’ll keep you right.

GREEN OR GOLD OPEN ACCESS?

Most journals offer a REF compliant Green Open Access route, meaning that they allow the accepted manuscript to be deposited in the institutional repository. This can be checked at Sherpa Romeo or library staff can help.

If you have been funded by UKRI or Wellcome and you wish to publish in a fully open access journal then contact openaccess@abdn.ac.uk who can check to see if we have funds available to pay the Article Processing Charge.

Sadly there are no central funds available for APCs.

The University has a number of Open Access Agreements with publishers where you may be able to publish gold open access at no additional cost or at a discounted rate.

KEEP US INFORMED!

Help us to keep the Pure record up to date by informing us of any changes to the publication details. Email us at paperaccepted@abdn.ac.uk

FURTHER HELP AND INFORMATION

Rebecca Hankinson, Principal Information Assistant (Medical Library),
University of Aberdeen
October 2020

Protected Data in Datasets and Open Access: what you need to know

When it comes to making your dataset open-access, it’s all pretty simple isn’t it? Collect and collate the data you need to present, then make it available in an institutional or subject repository under an open licence and that’s it. Well, not quite!

You need to be aware of how copyright and other types of legal protection work in respect of datasets, and of any steps you will need to take to ensure that your datasets can be made freely available to others whilst respecting any rights  that apply to individual components or types of information contained in your dataset.

WHY DOES IT MATTER?

Protection of different types of data takes many forms. Researchers need to be aware of the legal landscape within which they produce and use research data and how this affects the way in which datasets can be made available for re-use by other researchers.  The University recommend using the Open Data Commons Open Database Licence  as a means of making your data open. This licence allows users to use, copy and distribute the database, to create other works based on the contents of the database and to modify, adapt or build on the database. (N.B. the terms datasets and databases in this context are used interchangeably). These are activities which are often regulated by other legal forms of protection such as copyright, database rights and General Data Protection Register,  so before applying an open licence to a dataset, a researcher needs to know whether any of the elements in their dataset attract protection, and if so, how it could affect the ability to make the dataset open access and what if anything needs to be done to ensure the rights and protections applying to the contents of the dataset are not infringed.

HOW CAN I TELL WHAT IS PROTECTED? 

Research data comes in many forms; depending on the type of project, the dataset containing the evidence underpinning the research could comprise  amongst others, observational data such as temperature measurements, body-weight recordings,  computer code or software, survey data, collections of digital images, collections of newspaper articles, collections of private correspondence,  transcripts or recordings of interviews or physical artefacts such as artworks or musical compositions.  Individual data elements within a dataset may enjoy protection, and collections of data can also enjoy Sui Generis database protection.  Personal data are protected under the GDPR (General Data Protection Register).

Copyright

Copyright law grants the rightsowner a number of exclusive rights including the right to copy, distribute and adapt the work and to sell or licence the copyright for use by others. Facts in themselves are not protected by copyright, rather, it is the original expression which is protected by copyright, and the work in question must demonstrate “the author’s own intellectual creation”.

A wide range of outputs enjoy copyright protection including:

  • Original literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works;
  • Computer programs and software code;
  • Databases (in addition to the separate Database Right). This only applies where the selection or arrangement is original, and the protection only applies to the structure of the database and not the contents.
  • Sound recordings, films or broadcasts; and
  • Typographical arrangements of published editions.

Datasets comprising third-party copyright material, for example collections of newspaper articles, posts from social media sites cannot be made open access without first obtaining the permission of the rightsholders.  Similarly, where a researcher wants to include recorded interviews in a dataset, that is intended to be made available to others on an open-access basis, they would need to obtain the permission of the participants in order to do this.  Data obtained from archived datasets hosted in  subject or other repositories  is often made available for personal use, but if the datasets are intended to be further disseminated, then the permission of the rightsholder(s) of the dataset will need to be obtained.

Database Rights

In the European Union, the SGDR (Sui Generis Database Right) protects original and non-original databases.  Database rights can only apply where there has been substantial investment in the collection, verification and presentation of data obtained from independent sources. Efforts expended in creating the data populating the database does not automatically confer a database right. Database rights are protected for 15 years from the date of creation or publication. Once a database has been made available to the public, the Database Right allows authorised users to extract and re-use a substantial portion of the content for specific non-commercial purposes under “fair dealing”.  For some complex databases, the structure itself can be categorised as a literary work (even if its contents are of a visual nature) and attract 70 years’ copyright similar to other literary material.

General Data Protection Register (GDPR)

Datasets pertaining to research in any discipline which uses personal data such as medical science, social sciences and the humanities are required to comply with the provisions of the GDPR.  Datasets containing personal data cannot be made open access, even those where the data has been pseudo-anonymised.  Datasets containing fully anonymised data may be made available.

WHAT DO I NEED TO DO?

Before you start your research, you should be aware of any requirements to make your dataset open.  This may be as a result of a mandate from your funding body, or in response to the University’s Research Data Management Policy. The best time to consider whether you need to obtain permission to make data available is when creating your data management plan. The plan should outline what data will be created and how, and should include details on how the data will be shared, paying attention to any rights, protections and restrictions that may need to be taken into consideration.

Mary Mowat, Copyright Officer, University of Aberdeen
October 2020