EBSCO Quick Guide

The EBSCO platform contains databases across many subject areas. Each database contains information on research published in selected journals and conferences. Some of the databases contain information related to books. Here are the databases currently available from EBSCO:  

Anthropology Plus, Art & Architecture Complete, ATLA Religion Database, British Education Index, Child Development & Adolescent Studies, CINAHL, Education Abstracts, Educational Administration Abstracts,  ERIC, European Views of the Americas: 1493 to 1750, GreenFILE, LISTA, MLA International Bibliography with Full Text, RILM Abstracts of Music Literature, SPORTDiscus, Teacher Reference Center.  

Sign in to Primo and search for a title. If the book is available from EBSCO, the following steps will apply:

 Click on the title of the book to be taken to the book details page and navigate to the full text using your University username and password.

Once you are in EBSCO, the book will be displayed like so:

You have the options of Reading the book online (PDF Full Text) or Download the item. If you choose reading online, it will display like this:  

If you choose to download, the following messages will be displayed on your screen. Please note that different books may have different downloading options, depending on the Digital Rights Management (DRM) agreements. For a non-DRM book, the steps to download are as follows:  

The image is showing the prompt that will appear to 'Download Ebook.' There are options to do this as a PDF, or as an 'E-PUB' for mobile devices.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is down-arrow-2.png

For a book requiring a DRM licence, please note that you will need to set up an EBSCO Personal Account. Advice on how to do so can be found at https://bit.ly/3xl84j0.

To download, select your preferred ‘Download Format’ like so:  

Once the item is downloaded, the site recommends you open it with Adobe Reader. More information can be found at:  

https://bit.ly/3vx8phj 
https://adobe.ly/3vDtDKc

User Features in EBSCO  

Once you have found the book(s) you need in EBSCO, there are a range of options as to how you can use them. This Tools section can be found on the right hand side of the item’s display page as shown:  

If you are reading online, similar icons are displayed across the top of the screen:  

Adding/Saving Items to Folder: EBSCO offers this feature to act as a virtual bookshelf, where you also have options to save, print or email the details, and export them to RefWorks or similar programmes.  

Saving/Emailing References: EBSCO allows both singular and multiple references to be taken from searched material. Detailed instructions and advice on how to do so can be found in the Help section under ‘Emailing’: https://bit.ly/3cPJUFB

Exporting Bibliographic Details to Ref Works-Option to Export on right hand side of screen. Opens links to Ref Works and other providers, and can directly export. For further help, please see our detailed Library Guides.   

Accessibility-The Help section includes an Accessibility Guide covering navigation of the site, the readers (PDF and EPUB), read aloud software and EBSCO’s commitments. It can be found here: https://bit.ly/3vD86RV   

Help and Support-Extensive Help section on website (top right-hand side of screen). Includes user guides, accessibility pages and tutorials.  

Licences-There are three categories here: ‘Unlimited User Access’; ‘Limited Access (3 Users)’, and ‘Limited Access (1 User)’. If the book is unavailable, the site will give various messages along the lines of ‘Item unable to download. Please Read Online’ or ‘Item unavailable for download, please try again later.’  

If you wish to search a specific database on the EBSCO platform, please follow these steps:  

  1. Go to Primo and sign in at the top right of the screen 
  1.  Select the Find Databases tab 
  1. In the new window that appears enter EBSCO in the box called Database Search and click on search 
  1. A list will be created containing the different databases which we currently have access to through the EBSCO platform  
  1. Click on any one of the databases to link out to the EBSCO platform. Primo will open the database’s details page. In the View Online section click on the name of the database e.g. ERIC (EBSCO). Once on EBSCO you can change the particular database you are actually searching in. If off-campus, you may be asked to sign in via your institution. Select University of Aberdeen and sign in with your username and password. 

For more information see our EBSCO worksheet

Lucy Drysdale and Louise Faustino

VLeBooks Quick Guide

Did you know that a small number of e-books are available to us via the VLeBooks platform? These e-books are listed in Primo and require a Shibboleth login. Read on to find out how to access and use books on the VLeBooks platform.

Sign in to Primo and search for a title. If the book is available from VLeBooks, the following steps will apply:

In the book’s record, click on either the title of the book, or the Available Online link. You will be taken to the book’s details page:

In the View Online section click on the blue VLeBooks link. You may be asked to sign in with your University username and password.

Please note: if you didn’t sign in to Primo prior to your search, the following screen may appear:

Do Not Choose the above option. Instead, click on the Shibboleth option and on the next page type “Aberdeen” into the Find your institution box. Select University of Aberdeen. The University’s login screen will appear – log in as normal.

You will then be taken to the book’s details page:

Main options: Read Online & Download (equivalent to borrowing the book.)

If you choose to read online, you will see the below display:

To download: please ensure Adobe Digital Editions has been installed on your device. Instructions can be found at https://www.vlebooks.com/Vleweb/Help/DigitalEditions

The option for this item is to download for 1-3 days. Other items are avaliable for longer to download depending upon licence agreements.

Once the book has been downloaded, you can either choose to open it with ADE, or simply save the item to your desktop and then move it into your ADE Platform. Once it is displayed within ADE, you will be able to read it like an online book within the set time frame.

Additional Features

Help and Advice – Range of information on the “Help”icon on upper toolbar of VleBooks home screen with advice topics relating to downloading and reading a VLEbooks, and accessibility.

Accessibility Settings – ‘Edit Accessibility Settings’ are given throughout the site, above the link to ‘My Bookshelves.’ There are extensive options here to modify the display to suit your needs.

Also, within the book on the upper toolbar, you can change the background colour and choose the Read Aloud option using the icons at the top right hand of the screen. There is further information available from the ‘VLE Books Quick Reference Guide’, which is accessible through the question mark icon.

Adding Books to your Bookshelf  – Add directly from the title page, into named folders if required.

Download Citations – The “Download Citations” function on the book details page will download an RIS File to your device containing the reference details of the item. Please be aware that the RIS File cannot be directly exported to RefWorks or any other reference software from VLE Books. Further information and support in this can be found in our Library guides (https://www.abdn.ac.uk/library/support/library-guides-101.php#R)

Louise Faustino and Lucy Drysdale

Celebrating Neurodiversity: Resources Available in the Library

As part of the University of Aberdeen’s support for Neurodiversity Celebration Week (March 15-21), the Library would like to highlight materials from our collection that contain a wealth of resources and research on neurodiversity and its impact.

Neurodiversity Celebration Week Graphic

Neurodiversity describes the many different ways that our brains can work and how we interpret information and see the world around us.You may also have friends and family who have conditions that come under this umbrella term. These include:

  • Autism
  • Dyslexia
  • Dyspraxia
  • ADHD

You may already be aware of the challenges that these conditions can pose, and unfortunately, the misconceptions that society has regarding them. However, they can also be a source of several strengths for individuals and collectively produce new and innovative products, services and research.

Neurodiversity

There are several perspectives on how different sectors of society work with neurodiversity and neurodiverse groups. In education, the following authors seek to empower and equip students and staff:

Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strength-Based Strategies to help Students with Special Needs succeed in School and Life by Thomas Armstrong: This book takes an in-depth look at all aspects of neurodiversity, examining the conditions and highlighting the unique strengths that individuals can have, particularly spotlighting notable people who have achieved lasting recognition.

The Adolescent and Adult Neuro-diversity Handbook: Asperger’s Syndrome, ADHD, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and Related Conditions by S Hendrickx: Aimed at young people and adults who may not have been formally diagnosed, but wish to know more about the range of conditions,their implications and get some advice regarding coping strategies.

Current Issues in Developmental Disorders by Chloe Marshall: Covering a range of conditions both on the neurodiversity spectrum and ‘syndromic conditions’ like Down’s syndrome, Marshall explores contemporary research in developmental psychology across all these conditions, seeking to understand the neurological bases of neurodivergence.

Ethics and Neurodiversity by C.D Herrera: In strongly challenging the view that neurodivergent individuals are not eligible for civil rights, Herrera’s work fully examines the moral and legal framework of society and where and how it needs to change.

Neurodiverse be the Policymakers! A Study Exploring News Text Informed Potential for Anxiety-Enhanced Policymaking and Guiding the Progressive Reporting of Mental Diversity by Damian Mellifont: This article explores the possibilities for a truly creative approach to Australia’s national mental-health policy and solving the social issues surrounding it-involving neurodiverse people in generating ideas for policy through harnessing their experiences and the grass-roots campaigning they’re largely involved in, as well as providing a framework for progressive journalism around the subject.

Autism & ADHD

Autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are common conditions: with approximately 4% of people having ADHD and 2% diagnosed with Autism. (Source: Neurodiversity Celebration Week.)

People with autism and ADHD are widely considered to be highly logical, extremely detail-oriented, energetic and focused.

Autism in the Workplace: Creating Positive Employment and Career Outcomes for Generation A by Amy Hurley-Hanson: Focusing on the needs of those with ‘Autism Spectrum Disorders’ (ASD) in employment, this book strives to provide a detailed practical framework for employers, employees and educational institutions to ensure successful work experiences and careers.

Autistic Community and the Neurodiversity Movement: An overview of the history of autism rights campaigning, which critically examines the developments in perceptions of autism, the successes of particular advocacy work, and how individuals have influenced the neurodiversity movement.

The Dysregulated Adult Integrated Treatment Approaches by Georgia DeGangi: Focusing on a wide range of conditions, this item is a strong overview of diagnostic tools and checklists, including for autism and ADHD, that focuses on the medical side of treatments and managing the conditions.

Human Behaviour, Learning and the Developing Brain: Atypical Development by Donna Coch et al: Looking at some of the psychological and behavioural developments that underpin and define the various conditions, this gives an understanding into different medical theories on the subject.

Dyslexia & Dyspraxia

10% of the population are dyslexic, meaning that they are creative, dynamic problem solvers & storytellers. Similarly, 6% are dyspraxic, and thus are highly likely to be determined and strategic. (Source: Neurodiversity Celebration Week)

Living with Dyspraxia: A Guide for Adults with Developmental Dyspraxia by Mary Colley et al: Written with the insight of someone with dyspraxia who campaigns for support and inclusion, this gives a good grounding into the challenges faced by people with dyspraxia in daily life.

Dyslexia Included: A Whole School Approach by Michael Thomson: Based on the experiences of educators at a specialist school, this volume offers a range of tried and tested strategies and a wealth of advice for teachers in order to best help students.

Making Dyslexia Work for You by Vicki Goodwin: In a more user-focused approach, this book encourages the reader to put together their own ‘support package’: ideas, strategies and coping mechanisms that work for them in managing dyslexia.

More Information and Support

The University of Aberdeen is committed to providing a welcoming, secure and inclusive environment to all students, staff and visitors. The University’s Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Team offer a plethora of information, training resources and links to support, student organisations and both staff and student networks across diversity and equality issues. More information and contact details for EDI are available from the University website .

Lucy Drysdale

Reading for Pleasure: Christmas 2020 Reading Adventures

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

Coming to the end of this year, we are sure many of you have plans for a relaxing break. These past twelve months may also have left you in a reflective and inquiring mood. Whether you want to escape into a fictional world; or continue exploring ideas from your studies, we hope that this blog post will give you some inspiration.

Philosophy deals with the largest, most complex questions and problems facing humanity. Movies, television and culture explore stories based on these questions and give an opportunity for scholars to debate and discuss what the stories mean. They can also give rise to creative and exciting new worlds. Here at the library, several e-books in our collections have explored various queries and theories with reference to some of our greatest literary works:

Lord of the Rings and Philosophy by Gregory Bassham and Eric Bronson: A fantastic primer on Tolkien’s famous trilogy, bringing together international academics to debate whether or not superhuman power can be used for good, or do humans always become addicted and corrupt?

How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy by Stephen Clarke broadens the questions that science fiction can explore. Sections here discuss technology and its ability to influence and assist humanity; and the world of medicine and its attendant concerns with immortality.

Photo by Ehud Neuhaus on Unsplash

A wealth of relevant fictional tales are available online from Aberdeen City Libraries using the ‘Borrow Box’ service. More information can be found here. Some examples of the items available include:

The Last Human by Lee Bacon: A story set in a dystopian world where humanity is (supposedly) extinct and Earth is run by machines. Everything seems perfect and in order without war, pollution, crime or poverty. What happens then, when a robot meets a 12-year old? Join XR-935 on this extremely unlikely friendship, and follow their poignant, funny adventure together as they work out what it really means to be human.

The Ghost Network: Activate by I.I Davidson: John, Slack, Akone and Salome are all passionate about computer coding, gaming and hacking; and are thrilled to be at ‘Wolf’s Den’, a specialist academy, with other technologically adept souls from around the world. Then they discover Project 31, a secret study run by the school’s leaders using the pupils themselves as guinea pigs, and two shocking facts: they are all legally dead, and John’s scientist father planted A.I inside him before mysteriously vanishing. In order to find answers and escape their enemies, the four of them must flee across the tundra.

Several of the themes here also work well in festive tales, where characters can build new lives and find new strengths. The following item is also available electronically from City Libraries:

The Clockwork Crow by Catherine Fisher: A Victorian mystery where orphaned Seren has to work out what a mysterious package contains, with the help of the strange ‘Christmas Crow’, a supernatural being who will lead her to ‘Tom’. Who is he? Can Seren trust him? And why must she find him before the owner of the parcel finds her? A fascinating adventure story exploring themes of family and belonging.

Another philosophical book that you can find on Primo is inspired by Tolkien’s contemporary and friend C. S Lewis:

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Worldview by Gregory Bassham & Jerry Walls: A great primer based on Lewis’ fantastic tales of adventures, magic and coming of age. It also covers the adult topics of morality, gender, free will and the implications of our choices.

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

It could be paired with a number of modern day adventure stories that explore growing up, and the questions that come with facing difficult experiences and decisions. Examples of stories in this vein available from Aberdeen City libraries include:

The Ruby in the Smoke by Philip Pullman: Sally Lockhart must track down her father’s killer. She’s perfectly equipped to do it, having had an unconventional upbringing for a Victorian lady: being a brilliant accountant who can ride like a Cossack, shoot like a demon and speak fluent Hindustani. Following the trail of the titular jewel, the first in this series is a masterful adventure story that completely transports you to historic London, India and China.

A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket: This series follows the Baudelaire children as they navigate the world of their eccentric extended family, outwitting and defeating their malevolent Uncle Olaf at every turn. Witty, absurd and extremely memorable. (Please note that the first of this series is available in audiobook format here, and you must be logged into the City Libraries online catalogue for this link to work. More information on how to join them can be found later in this post.)

The Storm Leopards by Holly Webb: A magical tale of family bonds and discovering new passions. When Isabelle and her family visit their local zoo, she comes across a beautiful snow leopard, and is entranced. Determined to help them, she soon finds out about conservation efforts in Mongolia centred on a mother leopard and her cubs.

Photo by Andreea Radu on Unsplash

Before you go, here are a further few suggestions for festive reading:

The Lost Casebooks of Sherlock Holmes by Donald Thomas: The game is afoot! Join Holmes and Watson for sixteen tales of intellectual derring-do that see them contend with ‘supernatural curses’, find lost treasures, assist Winston Churchill at Sydney Street and foil a German invasion.

Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle: If Thomas has whetted your appetite Aberdeen City Libraries have the original mysteries available in print and online, including audiobooks read by Stephen Fry.

Access to e-resources

To find out more about the City Libraries, their collections and services, please do visit their website here. Membership of Aberdeen City Libraries is available to people who work, live or study in Aberdeen City or Shire. If you are not already a member, you can join online now and start using the online services immediately. Sign up for free here.

To access our e-books remember to sign in to Primo; then in the ‘View Online’ section in Primo click on the name of the provider (e.g. Ebook Central) to link to the full-text of an e-book. If the e-book provider presents you with a Shibboleth authentication screen, enter your University username and password again.

Our Christmas Vacation hours can be found here.

On behalf of all library staff here at the University, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. And happy reading!

Lucy Drysdale

Podcast Series: A New History of the University of Aberdeen

To celebrate the University’s 525th Anniversary a new podcast series has been developed that will present a new history of the University of Aberdeen; one that accounts for the University’s activities in the transnational and global transmission of ideas since its foundation.

Listen now at: http://ow.ly/KsDY50CBncZ

Please find out more on the University’s event page: https://www.abdn.ac.uk/events/16216/

Study spaces on our campuses

We would like to remind you of the study spaces available on our campuses. These include spaces with computers. Find out about the bookable and drop-in study spaces available and don’t forget that as well as The Sir Duncan Rice Library, the Taylor Library on the Old Aberdeen campus and the Medical Library at Foresterhill are also available!

Update to the Jisc Wiley Open Access Publishing Agreement

Funds in the Jisc Wiley Open Access Agreement have been exhausted for 2020. The agreement will reopen in January 2021. Articles submitted for publication in Wiley subscription journals should be published under the standard licence to publish; taking the green open access route to deposit the accepted manuscript in Pure/AURA. For fully open access journals please ensure that there is funding available before submitting a paper. Should funding be secured a 25% discount is available – please contact openaccess@abdn.ac.uk for the promotional code. Further information is available on our webpages or contact Joanna Adams, Scholarly Communications Officer.

Welcome to the Library

We look forward to welcoming to the Library our new and returning students and helping you make the most of the Library’s resources and services, whether you are based off- or on-campus. Our staff are here to help so please get in touch with any queries you may have about the Library service.

For general enquiries, contact us on library@abdn.ac.uk

For subject-related and search enquiries please contact the Information Consultant for your discipline. Contact details for ICs are available here.

Library Resources

When searching for books on your Reading List, or other resources, use the Library’s discovery tool Primo. This is the recommended access route to our extensive e-resources, digital collections and databases. Primo also provides information about our printed resources.

Our comprehensive Library guides offer detailed answers to any questions you may have about our resources. If you haven’t used Primo before, you may find the following guides helpful:

Primo Quick Guide
Primo: How to do a simple search successfully  
Primo: How to do an advanced search successfully
Accessing e-resources  

IT Issues  

If you have any problems with your device or accessing information, please contact the IT Service Desk. Contact information can be found here.

Visiting the Library

If you’re coming to the library in person, don’t forget to wear a mask throughout your time in the building. Full details of the COVID-19 rules and regulations and adaptations to our services that we have implemented can be found in this earlier blog post.

Please note that there is now a webpage on our site where you can see the current occupancy of the TSDRL and Taylor libraries. The page is available here.

Please come and find us on our social media channels to keep up with news from the Library. Once again, we would like to extend a warm welcome to all our students and wish you all a happy start to the new academic year.

Did you Know…? – help with referencing

Once you have researched and begun writing your dissertation or project you must remember to correctly acknowledge the sources of any information which you refer to, as this allows readers to trace the original material while also ensuring that you avoid potentially committing plagiarism. 

To help you with your referencing, Library staff have prepared several online guides with useful examples. We have a generic guide on Referencing and Citing as well as others focused on specific referencing systems or subject areas: 

Please be sure, though, to also refer to any specific referencing guidance which you may have been provided by your department. You can also see advice on avoiding plagiarism on the Student Learning Service’s website.  

If you are looking for a tool to help you organise your references and also produce your bibliography, then why not create a free account with RefWorks, an online reference management tool that the University of Aberdeen subscribes to. For more information and instructions on how to create an account please check our quick library guide to RefWorks

If you need any help with referencing your dissertation or project please do contact Library staff